Doubts about religion? You're one of many.

Chandler Owen

Chandler Owen

Progressive-Era editor, writer, and labor activist
Read about him in Historic Black Humanists.

Kimberly Veal

Kimberly Veal

Executive Director of Black Nonbelievers of Chicago, Inc.; IT professional
Read about her in Our Stories.

We are African Americans for Humanism.

African Americans may be the nation's most religious minority, but the churches and religious leaders don’t speak for many of us.

Today as in the past, many African Americans question religion and religious institutions. More and more of us stand for reason over faith. Freethought over authority. Critical thinking in place of superstition. Many of us are nonreligious; some are nontheistic.

African Americans for Humanism supports skeptics, doubters, humanists, and atheists in the African American community, provides forums for communication and education, and facilitates coordinated action to achieve shared objectives.

In an irrational world, those who stand for reason must stand together.

Are you one of the growing number of African Americans who has had doubts about religion? Are you "good without God"? Share your story.

Day of Solidarity

The Day of Solidarity is February 23, 2014

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Celebrated nationwide on the last Sunday of Black History Month, the Day of Solidarity for Black Non-Believers (DoS) is held to promote community and solidarity among blacks in America who identify as non-believers: atheists, agnostics, skeptics, freethinkers, etc. The DoS was organized as a way to counter the religious voice that all too often serves as the lone voice of black consciousness and experience. These gatherings will promote fellowship and the pursuit of humanist strategies to solve the problems facing humanity—especially those affecting the black community.

Learn More about the Day of Solidarity

Local Groups

We are African Americans for Humanism.

AAH supports a growing network of campus and community groups.

Find or Start a Group